Hi there!

I’m Romy - a designer, researcher and recent Harvard grad, dedicated to unlocking civic innovation, rethinking humane technology and experimenting with any new tool that comes my way. 



Find out more:
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︎ Linkedin
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Currently researching / interested in:
︎ Collective intelligence
︎ Design Fiction
︎ Civic Futures
︎ Fixing Social Media

Favorite / recommended podcasts:
︎ Your Undivided Attention 
︎ Invisibilia 
︎ Recode Decode

Currently reading:
︎ Adverdarial Design
︎ Speculative Everything

Featured            UX Design            Code            WorldBuilding



LEBANOCRACIA

Harvard Law School | 2018
Collaborators: Emily Yang, Jeremy Wetz, Marcus Comiter, Victor Leahy
Instructor: Susan Crawford
Duration : 1 month

Tools used: Adobe Suite

︎Problem: How do we prepare for a future with autonomous vehicles? We have developed a set of policy and design measures to be implemented for 3 different scenarios: the Detroit model, the Singapore model, and the Portland model.





What does the future of a self-driving Boston look like in 10 years?






The Detroit Model



The city relies on private AV fleets as the new public transportation. Transport is decentralized, with a mix of electric and gas-powered AVs on the road. See below the policy and design recommendations for such a scenario.








The Singapore Model




The city has reinvested in public transport, breaking from the hub and spoke model to serve more neighborhoods with city-owned electric AV fleets as a “last-mile” service. See below the policy and design recommendations for such a scenario.







The Portland Model



The city has reinvested in public transport, breaking from the hub and spoke model to serve more neighborhoods with city-owned electric AV fleets as a “last-mile” service. See below the policy and design recommendations for such a scenario.









UX Research




During our final presentation, we concluded that a site-specific approach would be ideal when imagining and implementing an Autonomous Future. We found that a shifting city (like proposed in the Portland Model) where street infrastructure depends on seasons and user demand would be ideal to avoid a “Hell Scenario” in a self-driving Boston.


I decided to extend the class of “Autonomous Vehicles and Local Government Lab” into my own design research under the supervision of Andres Sevstuk. My paper focused on shifting perpectives from a policy and top-down standpoint to a more human-centric approach.


Can we listen to people’s concerns and fears about AVs and have it feed into the plan of a city? How can a UX approach make the planning of a self-driving city and vehicle better?


My main source of research were the two books:
1. ustwo’s “Humanizing Autonomous Vehicles” where the company interviewed city dwellers about how they perceived self-driving cars.
2. Go Boston 2030 for a research that was both community based and grounded in urban planning.





The User Needs

Based on gathering ustwo and GoBoston 2030’s findings






The User Flow

Passenger vs Pedestrian








Ideation


After going through the user needs and flow / opportunities, it was time to think of the most important features that a self-driving had to showcase. In addition to the car itself, the city’s infrastructure would need to cater for these.




Solution to user pains



Based on the passenger and pedestrian pains expressed in GoBoston 2030 and ustwo’s book, I drew a set of solutions and AV features essential for a comfortable, functional and seamless user experience.